Acta Stereologica

0351-580X

 

since 05 December 2013 :
View(s): 121 (1 ULiège)
Download(s): 95 (1 ULiège)
print        
Peter Meidahl Petersen, Bente Pakkenberg & Aleksander Giwercman

The human testis studied using stereological methods

Article
Open Access

Attached document(s)

Annexes

Abstract

The aim of the present pilot study was estimate the total number of Leydig cells and Sertoli cells and the number weighed mean volume of the Leydig cells in men. During the last years, efficient unbiased and relative fast methods to quantificate cells are developed. A principle based on a systematic uniform sampling scheme, the fractionator and a three dimensional counting probe, the optical disector, was used to estimate the total number of Sertoli and Leydig cells in four men. No assumptions about shape, size or orientation of the cells or shrinkage of the organ are needed, when these methods are used. A new method to characterize the volume and the size distribution of cells, the rotator was used to estimate the number weighted mean volume. The mean total number of Sertoli and Leydig cells in normal men was estimated to 1140 x 106 (CE (SEM/mean) = 0.14) and 180 x 106 (CV (SD/mean) = 0.20) respectively. The mean volume of Leydig cells was estimated to 3099 µm3 (CV = 0.24).

Keywords : fractionator, Leydig cells, optical disector, Sertoli cells, testis

To cite this article

Peter Meidahl Petersen, Bente Pakkenberg & Aleksander Giwercman, «The human testis studied using stereological methods», Acta Stereologica [En ligne], Volume 15 (1996), Number 2 - Applications of stereology in life sciences - July 1996, 181-185 URL : https://popups.ulg.ac.be/0351-580x/index.php?id=4740.

About: Peter Meidahl Petersen

Department of Growth and Reproduction, National University Hospital Copenhagen, Denmark; Stereologic Research Laboratory, University Bartholin Building, Aarhus, Denmark

About: Bente Pakkenberg

Neurological Research Laboratory, Bartholin Institute, Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; Stereologic Research Laboratory, University Bartholin Building, Aarhus, Denmark

About: Aleksander Giwercman

Department of Growth and Reproduction, National University Hospital Copenhagen, Denmark